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Stoss, Veit [German, 1447?-1533]


[ 16th Century Artists | Sculptors ]
portrait

Veit Stoss (also Veit Stoß), Polish Wit Stosz or Wit Stwosz (born 1438/47, Swabia [Germany] — died 1533, Nürnberg), one of the greatest sculptors and wood-carvers of 16th-century Germany. His nervous, angular forms, realistic detail, and virtuoso wood carving synthesized the sculptural styles of Flemish and Danubian art and, together with the emotional force and dramatic realism of the Dutch sculptor Nicolaus Gerhaert von Leyden, exercised tremendous influence on the late Gothic sculpture of Germany, especially that of Nürnberg.

Stoss grew up in Nürnberg. From 1477 to 1496 he worked mainly in Poland, Bohemia, and Hungary. His principal works are the majestic high altar, carved in limewood and painted, of the Church of the Virgin Mary in Kraków (1477–89) and the sculptured tombs of King Casimir IV and Archbishop Zbigniew Olesnicki in the cathedrals of Kraków and Gniezno, respectively.

When he returned to Nürnberg, he was defrauded of his savings. Attempting to regain them by forgery, he was discovered and branded, and he passed an embittered old age encumbered with civic disabilities, even though the Holy Roman emperor Maximilian I granted him full pardon. His work of this period includes important wood and stone sculpture in the churches of St. Sebaldus (1499, 1520) and St. Lorenz (1513, 1518) in Nürnberg and a carved altar in Bamberg cathedral (1523). These late works reveal greater restraint and compositional clarity, which probably derived from a study of the works of the Nürnberg painter Albrecht Dürer.

From October of 1916 through January of 1917, Rudolf Steiner gave a series of nine lectures known as the Art Course. These lectures were given the title of: The History of Art. Click here to discover what Steiner said about Stoss in the fourth lecture, or in the entire lecture series.


  Stoss, Veit [German, 1447?-1533]

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Title: Altarpiece of Veit Stoss (Polish: Ołtarz Wita Stwosza, German: Krakauer Hochaltar)
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Title: Detail: Altarpiece of Veit Stoss (Polish: Ołtarz Wita Stwosza, German: Krakauer Hochaltar)
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Title: Angelic Salutation (German: Engelsgruß)
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Title: Detail: Angelic Salutation (German: Engelsgruß)
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